Students encouraged to think about impact of tech



Were you tech savvy when you were a law student? Not me. I remember taking my books, handouts, and files in a very heavy backpack to the library. But: this was back in the 00’s. Practically ancient history for the law student today. Today, universities offer tailor made courses in legal tech or Masters that focus on IT or privacy law. You can even choose to Minor in, for example, writing code.

Recently Erasmus University, Erasmus Medical Center and the Dutch MIT (Technische Universiteit Delft) announced that they will be joining forces. They are offering joint courses on health, technology, AI and urbanization. Their aim is to teach students that AI will take up an increasing larger role in our society. Students are encouraged to reflect on what type of issues AI poses in areas such as health care and city life.

These type of collaborations between universities also exist in the U.S.and in the U.K. Last year, 21 universities in the U.S., including Stanford University, Berkeley and MIT, announced they would be joining forces "to train the next generation of software engineers, policymakers, civic leaders and social justice advocates to develop, regulate and use technology for the public good". In the U.K., students build apps that help disadvantaged people get access to legal assistance. They are encouraged to think about the down side of tech as well as its possibilities.

Hopefully many other educational institutions will follow suit. We also believe that (part) of the responsibility for thinking about societal impact of technology lies with the private sector. As a start, we at Legalloyd hope that we can help law students develop their technical skills by working for us. So that these skills can be used later in life for the greater good.